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Thursday, February 14, 2013

Group B Streptococcus (GBS)

I would like to share my experience to expecting mothers. I was detected as a Group B Streptococcus (GBS) carrier during my first pregnancy in 2010. Everything started when I was admitted for premature contraction at 33 weeks and a routine high vaginal swab (HVS) was taken and sent for culture and sensitivity, and it was positive for GBS. Eventhough the premature contraction was a false labour, I was labelled as GBS carrier and it does affect the management of my labour in the current and subsequent pregnancies.


What is GBS?

Group B strep (GBS) is a gram-positive streptococcal bacteria also known as Streptococcus agalactiae. This type of bacteria is commonly found in the human body, and it usually does not cause any symptoms. However, in certain cases, it can be a dangerous cause of various infections that can affect nonpregnant adults, pregnant women, and their newborns.

GBS affected about 15-45% healthy women, where it can colonize the vagina and gastrointestinal tract. Most of the time, the carrier are asymptomatic and does not require any treatment. It is spread from the colonized mother to newborn baby, with transmission rate of 50% in vaginal delivery.


Why is it important?

GBS can cause serious illness in newborns. Infected baby can get pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis and occassionally death if not treated properly. It is important to treat the affected mother in labour with prophylactic intravenous antibiotic. The affected baby should be treated with antibiotic as well.


Back to my story...

So I was given antibiotic during labour and my first son, Ameen stayed in the hospital for a week to complete intravenous antibiotic due to his raised in total white cell count eventhough he was completely asymptomatic. He had jaundice as well and started on phototherapy. His blood culture was negative for GBS.

During my second pregnancy, everything was uncomplicated. I had my screening vaginal swab taken at 34 weeks with the expectation that most likely it will be positive for GBS. It was positive as expected (eventhough if it is negative, my obstetrician said she will cover me with antibiotic during labour in view of the past history).

I was given antibiotic during labour in my second pregnancy as well. 'Aaqib also stayed in the hospital under nursery for antibiotic for a week eventhough he has no symptoms because he had elevated white cell count. His blood culture was negative for GBS as well.

I know if I got pregnant in future, my baby will need to stay a bit longer for observation and antibiotic. It does not really matter as my baby's health is more important for me.

2 comments:

  1. Hi there, You have done a great job. I'll definitely digg it and personally suggest to my friends. I'm sure they will be benefited from this web site.


    My blog; Movers Dayton

    ReplyDelete
  2. I HAVENT VISITED UR BLOG IN A WHILE AISH!
    kUDOS FOR KEEPING THIS 'ALIVE' . LOL
    TAKE CARE DEAR

    ReplyDelete

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Group B Streptococcus (GBS)

I would like to share my experience to expecting mothers. I was detected as a Group B Streptococcus (GBS) carrier during my first pregnancy in 2010. Everything started when I was admitted for premature contraction at 33 weeks and a routine high vaginal swab (HVS) was taken and sent for culture and sensitivity, and it was positive for GBS. Eventhough the premature contraction was a false labour, I was labelled as GBS carrier and it does affect the management of my labour in the current and subsequent pregnancies.


What is GBS?

Group B strep (GBS) is a gram-positive streptococcal bacteria also known as Streptococcus agalactiae. This type of bacteria is commonly found in the human body, and it usually does not cause any symptoms. However, in certain cases, it can be a dangerous cause of various infections that can affect nonpregnant adults, pregnant women, and their newborns.

GBS affected about 15-45% healthy women, where it can colonize the vagina and gastrointestinal tract. Most of the time, the carrier are asymptomatic and does not require any treatment. It is spread from the colonized mother to newborn baby, with transmission rate of 50% in vaginal delivery.


Why is it important?

GBS can cause serious illness in newborns. Infected baby can get pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis and occassionally death if not treated properly. It is important to treat the affected mother in labour with prophylactic intravenous antibiotic. The affected baby should be treated with antibiotic as well.


Back to my story...

So I was given antibiotic during labour and my first son, Ameen stayed in the hospital for a week to complete intravenous antibiotic due to his raised in total white cell count eventhough he was completely asymptomatic. He had jaundice as well and started on phototherapy. His blood culture was negative for GBS.

During my second pregnancy, everything was uncomplicated. I had my screening vaginal swab taken at 34 weeks with the expectation that most likely it will be positive for GBS. It was positive as expected (eventhough if it is negative, my obstetrician said she will cover me with antibiotic during labour in view of the past history).

I was given antibiotic during labour in my second pregnancy as well. 'Aaqib also stayed in the hospital under nursery for antibiotic for a week eventhough he has no symptoms because he had elevated white cell count. His blood culture was negative for GBS as well.

I know if I got pregnant in future, my baby will need to stay a bit longer for observation and antibiotic. It does not really matter as my baby's health is more important for me.

2 comments:

  1. Hi there, You have done a great job. I'll definitely digg it and personally suggest to my friends. I'm sure they will be benefited from this web site.


    My blog; Movers Dayton

    ReplyDelete
  2. I HAVENT VISITED UR BLOG IN A WHILE AISH!
    kUDOS FOR KEEPING THIS 'ALIVE' . LOL
    TAKE CARE DEAR

    ReplyDelete